Sunday, November 26, 2006

Physician's Bookplates

Dr.Berry lived in Australia and he is reading a book about the preparation of mulch.
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I do not know very much about Dr. John.His bookplate was etched and signed by Vondorous in 1915.Since this is a collaborative undertaking perhaps one of you out there in cyberspace can share your knowledge with us. I can be reached at bookplatemaven@hotmail.com
If you have any physician's bookplates for possible inclusion in this posting please send me a scan.



Dr.Richard Hopping was a proctologist with a sense of humor, who practiced in the state of New Jersey.




Sigmund Freud-Super Star-No Biographical information required unless you are an alien from another planet. Click on images to enlarge




Dr.Thomas Dale practiced in Charles Town South Carolina around 1725. Ref. Annals of Medical History by Robert E. Seibels, M.D. vol.3 NO.1 pages 50-57








Dr.Cutbush (1772-1843) was a graduate of The University of Pennsylvania Medical School and practised in Philadelphia. In 1779, he was appointed surgeon in the U.S. Navy









Henry T. Child was a graduate of Jefferson Medical College (Philadelphia), class of 1843.On the back of my copy there is a pencil notation "Henry L. Stephens Sc." I find no listing for this artist in any of my references. There is reference on p. 350 in Mantle Fielding's Dictionary of American Painters, Sculptors and Engravers for a Frank L. Stephens who was in Philadelphia and was an illustrator and cartoonist known for his caricatures. Further research needs to be done.

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I have always been amused by this charming plate for Henrik Stenvald.It was designed by Per Christensen.

Sunday, November 19, 2006

Cheap Bookstores In Boston


Click On Images To Enlarge. 11/29/06 Steve Beare was kind enough to submit biographical information for
Eman Lycurgus Beck : Born 1875 ,resided in Mexico City and Littleton,New Hampshire,occupation banker--Thanks Steve the input is appreciated.




Click On Images To Enlarge The Burnham book store label came from Tom Boss in Wellesley, Massachusetts.I have been buying bookplates from him for about twenty years and consider him a friend. He has a large number of bookplates for sale, including a recently acquired selection of 18Th century American bookplates many of which came from the Richard C. Lichtenstein collection.


From time to time I have purchased 18Th century exlibris with a lavender colored tissue affixed to the back.It turns out that many of these bookplates came from the Lichtenstein collection. I do not know why Mr. Lichtenstein did this. Perhaps it was for easy identification if they were loaned out for an exhibit.


Tom Boss can be reached at info@bossbooks.com




The Parker bookplate is listed as item 642 in Charles Dexter Allen's Early American Bookplates


It came from the Lichtenstein collection and the background lighting from the scanner creates magical colors in the image because of the lavender backing.The plate is black grey and white.




Whenever I get to New England, The Boston Book Annex at 906 Beacon St is worth a visit. They have an incredible "one dollar room" in which many bookplate treasures have been found. Nothing found on this trip but you can't always hit home runs.




Here is another place to go on your Boston bookplate quest: The Bryn Mawr Bookshop in Cambridge ,Massachusetts.They are located at 373 Huron Ave.On this visit I got a bookplate for
Eman Beck.

A cursory Google search for more information about Mr. Beck led me to blind alleys . If you know something about him please share the information with us.I suspect he may have been a banker.



The best of the best is The Brattle Book Shop at 9 West Street in Boston .The store itself is well stocked , and the employees are very knowledgeable and helpful. .That, in itself is remarkable in this day and age but what is even more remarkable is that the vacant lot next to the shop is filled with rolling carts of books priced between one and five dollars. I have never left that lot empty handed. The Rothermere and Whitney plates were two of the best I found there.
TWO SITES I ENJOY READING
---------------------------
A site for bibliophiles run by a bookseller / collector whose enthusiasm is refreshing.
There are never enough hours in the day but if you like ephemera spend some time here.
That's all for this week




Sunday, November 12, 2006

Feel Good Cookies , H.G. Wells & Carolyn Wells




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I had over 4,ooo site visitors this week and was mentioned on the same day by a religious site and a porno blog. My friend Terry suggested that it sounded like One foot in Heaven and one foot in Hell. I was tempted to use that phrase as my headline but opted for something completly different.




Let me first of all explain that I have the pack rat gene and not only did I inhale in the sixties but I kept some of the ephemera .The label shown above was used on "feel good" cookies.This may be the only one that still exists. I am feeling good this morning not because I have a stash of forty year old cookies but because I am leaving for New England where I will looking for bookplate treasures .




H. G. Wells had a bookplate which is a label with an ornamental border. It is described by Brian North Lee on page 28 in London Bookplates : From the Library of H. C. Wells at 13 Hanover Terrace regent's Park London 1947 (with facsimile signature).




Several years ago I obtained an H. G. Wells bookplate quite different from the one described above.I called Brian North Lee for enlightenment but he was unfamiliar with it.There are two explanations: either it is an unrecorded plate or it is an honorarium plate. A bookplate designed by an artist without the consent or knowledge of the owner. More research needs to be done.


Carolyn Wells, the American author of children's literature used two bookplates that I know of and they are illustrated above.


That's all for now. I have to catch a train to Boston.


Saturday, November 04, 2006

18th CenturyAmerican Bookplates+Odds& Ends


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There is a fuzzy area in eighteenth century American bookplate collecting where two cultures intersect and it's not clear how to categorize some individuals, by country. The Loyalists, for example were American residents who chose to support the British during the revolution.

Many of them eventually fled to Canada or went back to England. Another hybrid group are the Englishmen who had vast land holdings in the Americas or resided in both countries.

Many books have been written about the loyalists and some of the ones I use most frequently are :
The Loyalists of The American Revolution by Lorenzo Sabine.
Divided Hearts Massachusetts Loyalists 1765-1790 by David E. Maas
British- Americans The Loyalist Exiles in England 1774-1789 by Mary Beth Norton
Sir Robert Eden
Last royal governor of Maryland (1768-1776) , resided in England during the revolution, returned to Annapolis after the war ended. REF. Sabine Vol 1, p 402
General De Lancey
Oliver De Lancey ,born in New York in 1717, descendant of a Huguenot family that had emigrated to America, was head of loyalist troops in America, died in England in 1785.
At the time of his death a fellow loyalist said "....There will scarcely be a village in England without some American dust in it, I believe, by the time we are all at rest" Ref.Sabine Vol.1 p.365
Jeremiah Dummer
Born in Boston about 1680 and died in England in 1739 . He was a benefactor of Yale College to which he presented 800 volumes. His dual citizenship is reflected in the motto on his bookplate "Anglus Americanus" Ref. Charles Dexter Allen Early American Bookplates P.195
William Axtell
Born in my old neighborhood, Flatbush, Brooklyn, N. Y.-Was a loyalist colonel , died in England in 1795
Dudleuis Woodbridge
Very rare early plate-land owner in the West Indies ,which at the time was considered part of The Americas Ref. West Indian Bookplates by Vere Langford Oliver P.28
Odds And Ends
Richard Schimmelpfeng is an avid collector who has accumulated many fine duplicate books about bookplates . He is currently selling his duplicates and can be reached at Rschimmelpfeng@snet.net
Stanford University has an excellent bookplate website, well worth a visit:
Biblomania in Schenectady , N. Y. has a number of 18th century bookplates for sale:
Jvarnoso has a new bookplate blog with special emphasis on armorial items-excellent !
I will be in New England during the week of November 13th , prior to attending the Boston shows. If you have bookplates for sale or trade please contact me.
That's all for this week.,