Thursday, February 19, 2015

Bookplate Odds and Ends 2/19/2015


Monday  February 23rd is the deadline for submitting your first round of bids for the Bookplate Society web auction.  A day or two after this we shall be seeing the bidding status available online against each lot, and registered participants will be able to increase or add bids. The end date has not yet been announced, but is expected to be sometime around the middle of March.  it’s not too late to register and take part.

Some Theatrical Bookplates

Billie Dove

Dove was born Bertha Bohny in 1903 to Charles and Bertha (née Kagl) Bohny,Swiss immigrants. As a teen, she worked as a model to help support her family and was hired as a teenager by Florenz Ziegfeld to appear in his Ziegfeld Follies Revue. She legally changed her name to Lillian Bohny in the early 1920s. and migrated to Hollywood, where she began appearing in silent films. She soon became one of the most popular actresses of the 1920s, appearing in Douglas Fairbanks' smash hit Technicolor film The Black Pirate (1926), as Rodeo West in The Painted Angel (1929), and was dubbed The American Beauty (1927), the title of one of her films.
She married the director of her seventh film, Irvin Willat, in 1923. The two divorced in 1929. Dove had a huge legion of male fans, one of her most persistent being Howard Hughes. She had a three-year romance with Hughes and was engaged to marry him, but she ended the relationship without ever giving cause. Hughes cast her as a comedian in his film Cock of the Air (1932). She also appeared in his movie The Age for Love (1931)

Ricardo Cortez

Bookplate designed by Bank Gordon

  In 1922 When Jacob Kranz arrived in Hollywood , the Valentino mania was in full swing. Never shy about changing a name and a background, the studio transformed Jacob Krantz  into Latin Lover Ricardo Cortez from Spain. Such was life in Hollywood.

Starting with small parts, the tall, dark Cortez was being groomed by Paramount to be the successor to Rudolph Valentino. But Cortez would never be viewed (or consider himself) as the equal to the late Valentino. A popular star, he was saddled in a number of run-of-the-mill romantic movies which would depend more on his looks than on the script. Pictures like Argentine Love (1924) and The Cat's Pajamas (1926) did little to extend his range as an actor. He did show that he had some range with his role in Pony Express (1924), but roles like that were few and far between.

With the advent of sound, Cortez made the transition and he would play Sam Spade in The Maltese Falcon (1931) (aka Dangerous Female). Never a great actor, Cortez was cast as the smirking womanizer in a number of films and would soon slide down into 'B' movies. He played a newspaper columnist Is My Face Red? (1932), a home wrecker in A Lost Lady (1934), a killer in Man Hunt (1936) and even Perry Mason in The Case of the Black Cat (1936).

After 1936, Cortez hit a lean patch for acting and tried his hand at directing. His career as a director ended after a half dozen movies and his screen career soon followed. 
He retired from the screen and returned to Wall Street, where he had worked as a runner decades before. This time, he returned as a member of one of Wall Street's top brokerage firms and lived a comfortable life.

 Some Interesting Links

Paula Jarvis at  The Book Club of Detroit writes about bookplates

-Ohio Bookplates

Hand Colored Proof  for Ohio Alcove in the American Library at Manila designed by Mrs. Mary E. Rath-Merrill and engraved by W.F. Hopson

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